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  • American Entropy is dedicated to the disruption and discrediting of neoconservative actions and the extreme ideals of the religious right.


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    08 July 2004
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    I am not in the crowd that compares the current conflict with Iraq a new Vietnam. I know too little about the conflict to make honest comparisons to that war nor do I believe that war will ever be as horrible as the wars we fought in the 20th century.

    It is apparent to me that the anti-war crowd, of which I have been in since the drums in the "fist-a-gon" started to beat, is gaining members at a healthy pace. Including service men returning from the war. A recent article out of Texas illustrates this new development (Subscription only). Interesting enough this took place in Texas, a state that slowly is showing signs of liberalism and open-mindedness.

    Here is some of the article:

    "I supported this war at first, when my administration led me to believe that it was the right thing to do to oppose the government of Saddam Hussein and free the Iraqi people," said Capt. David Harris, a 12-year veteran who recently returned from Iraq.

    He criticized the administration for accusing Saddam Hussein of harboring weapons of mass destruction, which have not been found in Iraq. Harris called on the small crowd to vote for the Democratic presidential ticket of Sens. John Kerry and John Edwards.

    Mike Hoffman, a former Marine who was in the first wave of service members to cross into Iraq last year, said Iraq is still dangerous despite Saddam's capture.

    "Democracy cannot be forced on people who don't want it," he said.



    Also, the birthday of our president was Tuesday, and was drowned out by the nomination of Edwards as Kerry's running mate. What was also drowned out was the now 1,000+ american soldiers dead in Iraq (871+) and Afghanistan (129). Thanks to KOS for pointing that out.

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